Descripción fonética y fonológica contrastiva del español y del inglés


Descripción fonética y fonológica del inglés

Estudios contrastivos inglés - español


Los elementos segmentales

Vocalismo

Inglés

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Fonemas vocálicos del inglés británico (RP)

Roach, P. (2004). British English: Received Pronunciation. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 34(2), 239-245. doi:10.1017/S0025100304001768

Ladefoged_99_americano_vocales.jpg

Fonemas vocálicos del inglés americano

Ladefoged, P. (1999). American English. En Handbook of the International Phonetic Association. A guide to the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (pp. 41-44). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Español

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Fonemas vocálicos del español peninsular (castellano)

Martínez Celdrán, E., Fernández Planas, A. M. y Carrera, J. (2003). Castilian Spanish. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 33(2), 255-259. doi:10.1017/S0025100303001373

Consonantismo

Inglés

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Fonemas consonánticos del inglés británico (RP)

Roach, P. (2004). British English: Received Pronunciation. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 34(2), 239-245. doi:10.1017/S0025100304001768

Ladefoged_99_americano_consonantes_1.jpg

Ladefoged_99_americano_consonantes_2.jpg

Fonemas consonánticos del inglés americano

Ladefoged, P. (1999). American English. En Handbook of the International Phonetic Association. A guide to the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (pp. 41-44). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Español

../Martinez_Celdran_et_al_03_consonantes_1.jpg

../Martinez_Celdran_et_al_03_consonantes_2.jpg

Fonemas consonánticos del español peninsular (castellano)

Martínez Celdrán, E., Fernández Planas, A. M. y Carrera, J. (2003). Castilian Spanish. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 33(2), 255-259. doi:10.1017/S0025100303001373

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Los elementos suprasegmentales

El acento

Inglés

“It has often been remarked that English stress is both free (in that any syllable is capable in principle of receiving stress) and fixed (since it only rarely happens in a particular context that more than one stress placement is acceptable). Many attempts have been made to produce rules for the placement of stress, either within the word or in higher-level units, but such rules have frequent exceptions.” (p. 243).

Roach, P. (2004). British English: Received Pronunciation. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 34(2), 239-245. doi:10.1017/S0025100304001768

Español

“Lexical stress is distinctive. Stress provides very productive contrasts, such as those between the first person singular of the present tense and the third person singular of the past in verbs of the first conjugation, like: amo-amó ‘I love-s/he loved’, lavo-lavó ‘I wash-s/he washed’, cambio-cambió ‘I change-s/he changed’, etc. It is also possible to contrast three words, a noun and two verbal forms, such as límite-limite-limité ‘boundary-limit (imperative)-I limited’, depósito-deposito-depositó ‘deposit-I deposit-s/he deposited’, etc.” (p. 257).

Martínez Celdrán, E., Fernández Planas, A. M. y Carrera, J. (2003). Castilian Spanish. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 33(2), 255-259. doi:10.1017/S0025100303001373
“Most Spanish words bear the stress on the penultimate syllable but any of the three final syllables may be stressed. In verb forms with enclitic personal pronouns, even the fourth syllable, starting from the end, can be stressed” (p. 257).

Martínez Celdrán, E., Fernández Planas, A. M. y Carrera, J. (2003). Castilian Spanish. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 33(2), 255-259. doi:10.1017/S0025100303001373

El ritmo

Inglés

“English rhythm is said to be stress-timed, i.e. the intervals between stressed syllables tend to be constant and unstressed syllables are compressed to preserve the isochrony of the interstress intervals. While the evidence for this is not completely conclusive, it is clear that in RP there is a very marked difference between weak, unstressed syllables which in some contexts may be almost undetectable and strong syllables (stressed or unstressed) which are fully pronounced” (p. 243).

Roach, P. (2004). British English: Received Pronunciation. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 34(2), 239-245. doi:10.1017/S0025100304001768

Español

“Spanish can be considered, in general, a syllable-timed language without an outstanding vowel reduction in unstressed syllables: ‘stresses separated by different numbers of unstressed syllables syllables will be separated by different intervals of time’ (Abercrombie 1967: 98)” (p. 257).

Martínez Celdrán, E., Fernández Planas, A. M. y Carrera, J. (2003). Castilian Spanish. Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 33(2), 255-259. doi:10.1017/S0025100303001373

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Descripción fonética y fonológica del inglés

Estudios contrastivos inglés - español


Descripción fonética y fonológica contrastiva del español y del inglés
Joaquim Llisterri, Departament de Filologia Espanyola, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

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